Monday, September 05, 2011

Third Time A Charm?

“Germany should now, as it has become peaceful and reasonable, get all that Europe and the whole world has refused in two gigantic wars, a sort of smooth hegemony over Europe.”
- Joschka Fischer, former German Foreign Secretary
It sure seems today, 72 years after its start, that it was Germany that had actually won World War Two. Overlay the map of the EU with that of the German Reich at the height of its power. Look how Yugoslavia was "wiped off the map" once again - this time by decree, and only then by bombs and boots on the ground. Behold, the same ethnic groups that once allied with Hitler find themselves the most enthusiastic "allies" of Berlin - or rather, its patron, the Atlantic Empire. That partnership probably goes a long way to explain the success of Germany's latest drive for European hegemony.

Julia Gorin just did a write-up about a presentation by Rodney Atkinson - former British Ministerial Adviser, author, and lecturer at University of Mainz in Germany - made in February 2008 (coincidentally, when German-supported Albanians declared the "Independent state of Kosova" in the occupied Serbian province) at the British House of Commons. The above quote is mentioned at the very end of Atkinson's presentation, the transcript of which can be found on Gorin's blog. The arguments presented there are culled from two books that Atkinson had written by then about the EU's roots in German designs for European hegemony.

Far-fetched? Not at all. Several years ago, one Serbian blogger tracked down several Nazi propaganda posters from the 1940s that extolled the virtues of National-Socialism and promised the Serbs an idyllic future in the "European family of nations" if only they'd just roll over and serve the Fuehrer. The similarity with pronouncements and promises from Brussels - often parroted by the sycophantic Serbian politicians - was uncanny. That is, until Atkinson pointed out the direct connection between Brussels and the 1940s Berlin. If the shoe fits...

The Germans certainly have perseverance. One would think that, failing to conquer Europe twice, in a spectacular and bloody fashion and at great cost to themselves (and others), they'd stop trying. It appears, however, they are still at it. Both times prior, their plans ran afoul of the Serbs and their stubborn resistance. That helps explain the present hostility for Belgrade and Berlin's support for its "legacy" allies in the region.

Thing is, Germans aren't the only people capable of holding a grudge, or soldiering on against the odds. I'm not sure about the Brits, or the rest of Europe, but somehow I don't quite think Serbia is as defeated as its enemies believe. And I doubt the third time will be a charm for Fritz.

8 comments:

Firefly said...

Perhaps that third attempt comes in the form of bailouts?

Eugene Costa said...

An important ethnographic expedition into the heart of darkest Austria:

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=3e5mivkXmsc

Asteri said...

well, even the Nazi's allowed Serbia to retain North Kosovo in 1941.

The Brits certainly do hold a grudge. There are parallels to what they're doing to Serbia now and the Versailles treaty. Westminster has a long history of using collective punishment and national humiliation on their foes while refusing to except that its rather counter productive. I've always felt that the US gets unfairly singled out as a pariah state, sparing the UK the attention that it deservers.

lopuza said...

Only in revised history books did Nazi's allow Serbia retain any part Kosovo, let alone North Kosovo.

Gray Falcon said...

@Firefly, actually, the bailouts are just the latest stage of the conquest. Forcing the other 11 EU countries to recognize Croatia and Slovenia in 1991 was the first.

@lopuza, If you look at the WW2 map of Albania as created by Mussolini and Hitler, you will see that a portion of the subsequently created (by the Communists) province was indeed left in occupied Serbia, and that a portion had been annexed to Bulgaria.

lopuza said...

Occupied means exactly that occupied, Northern portion was left in occupied Serbia...the way Yugoslavia was riped apart in WWII is not much different then it was in 1991/92., it took benevolent EU with prodding from the US and a little force from NATO to annex Kosovo once again from Serbia, which appears to be occupied once again.

http://www.kosovo.net/skenderbeyss.html

On April 6, 1941, Nazi Germany and the axis powers invaded Yugoslavia, Operation Punishment, and Greece forcing the capitulation of Yugoslavia on the 17th, and Greece on the 23rd. Yugoslavia was subsequently occupied and dismembered. The Axis powers established a greater Albania or greater Shqiperia at the expense of Serbia and Montenegro. Territory from Montenegro was annexed to Greater Albania. From Serbia, the Kosovo and Metohija were ceded to greater Albania, along with the western part of Southern Serbia (Juzna Srbija), now part of Macedonia, an area which was part of Stara Srbija (Ancient Old Serbia). This Kosovo-metohija region and the surrounding territory annexed to Greater Albania was called "New Albania".

Gray Falcon said...

In 1941, Germany dismembered Yugoslavia by force. In 1991, it had the EU dismember it by decree (death by recognition). The means change, the ends remain the same.

lopuza said...

Correct me if I am wrong, but strictly force was used in WWII, but in 1991/92-95, a threat of force as well force was used to make Serbia except the will of the US/EU, and of course the German initiated premature recognition of Slovenia and Croatia which led all of EU to do the same shortly after. All the events made Milosevic accept the loss of Slovenia and Croatia, while force in Bosnia allowed Serbians keep some of their land in Bosnia to remain somewhat independent as R.S. but still part of Bosnian Federation, in 1998 Kosovo was forcefully removed from Serbian control with bombs, ultimatums, etc...so the end remained the same, but also per US and EU/NATO the end justifies the means.